Current State of the COVID Vaccine Rollout

The problem with the COVID vaccine rollout in the United States is that each local government controls its administration. That means Americans are following 50 different plans, along with additional changes in their territories.

By the end of January 2021, approximately 27 million people had received their COVID-19 vaccine. About twice that many inoculations were sent to the states to ensure that the booster shots were available to those qualified for the first one.

That means approximately 8% of Americans are receiving their vaccines each month. Similar outcomes are being experienced in Europe, Asia, and Australia, which means it could be late summer or early fall before everyone gets a chance to get this protection.

Some States Are Doing Better Than Others

When we look at the distribution rates of the COVID-19 vaccine in the United States, a few governments are doing a lot better than others by getting people through their clinics and appointments.

West Virginia has been a national leader in this area, distributing over 80% of the vaccines it receives within 30 days of each shipment.

Only three other states are above 70% in this statistic: North Dakota, South Dakota, and New Mexico.

What makes this information interesting is that most of the states that see the best inoculation rates lean toward Republican politics. Many of the elected officials in that party were quick to say that COVID-19 isn’t scary, that masks aren’t necessary, and vaccines might not be needed. Now they’re the first ones in line.

What States Are Failing at Vaccine Distribution?

Most states are administering their COVID-19 vaccines at a 60% clip or higher. A few governments are falling far behind that curve.

Alabama is ranked last in this statistic, administering only 42.5% of the vaccines they’ve received to fight the coronavirus.

Eleven other states join Alabama in the under 50% category. They include California, Idaho, Maryland, Arizona, Mississippi, Massachusetts, Kansas, Missouri, Hawaii, Wisconsin, and Pennsylvania. [Source]

You can check on the up-to-date statistics by contacting your local government.