This Is What Biden’s Environmental Plan Includes

When Joe Biden first started running for office in 2019, one of his first released initiatives was to provide a “clean energy revolution.” By focusing on environmental justice, he hoped to set himself apart from the rest of the candidates.

That ambitious effort worked. After defeating Donald Trump in the general election, the Biden Administration started reversing the policies from the past four years that they saw as detrimental to the environment.

One of the first steps of that process was to rejoin the Paris Agreement.

What Does the Biden Plan Hope to Accomplish?

Biden and his team have some lofty goals with their environmental plan, but the efforts could lead the United States to a leadership position in future green energy solutions.

Here are the goals of the Biden plan.

1. Ensure a 100% clean energy economy.

Biden wants the United States to reach net-zero emissions by 2050. By creating a clean energy economy, the goal is to start reversing the problems that greenhouse gases cause with the global warming issue.

2. Build a stronger country.

Whenever technology changes happen, people get displaced from their jobs. Biden’s efforts include infrastructure updates that offer training to workers while encouraging greener transportation, construction, and resource access. This process also contains regional climate resiliency plans.

3. Stand up to the polluters.

Instead of allowing vulnerable communities to continue carrying the greatest portion of pollution’s dangers, Biden plans to take action against the companies that profit from fossil fuels and environmental damage. That means safe drinking water, access to electric vehicles, and other opportunities to restore the land.

By taking these steps, the Biden Administration hopes to bring the American environment back to a place of restoration. Although time will tell if it works, this structure does provide hope to many who were hurt by previous policies. If Kamala Harris succeeds the current President, she will likely follow through with the same plan.

Why a Senate Majority Is Critical for Democrats

After the January 6, 2021, insurgency where mostly Trump supporters stormed the Capitol Building to prevent Joe Biden’s certification as the 46th President, it became more apparent than ever that a Senate majority is critical for Democrats.

The Georgia runoff election changed the tide of governing in the United States until 2022. Unless something drastic happens, Democrats now control the White House, House of Representatives, and the Senate with VP Kamala Harris’ tie-breaking vote.

If Biden wants to leverage his position and start making legislative changes, it’s much easier to do that with Chuck Schumer in the lead than it would be for Mitch McConnell. The majority party gets control at the committee level, ensuring cabinet picks and reconciliation votes can breeze through in the coming months.

It Is Still a Long Path to Follow for Legislative Change

The Senate might offer a technical majority to Democrats, but it won’t be the most comfortable place to pass legislation. With the filibuster rules in place, a minimum of 60 votes is necessary to proceed on most new bills.

That means Democrats must work across the aisle to build relationships with their Republican colleagues if they want to get anything done.

What Biden and the Democrats can accomplish involves votes for replacing judicial members. Since Republicans won’t have enough votes in the Senate to prevent a confirmation, they can work to shape the course of American justice over the next few years. If McConnell had been the majority leader still, nothing would probably have been accomplished.

What to Expect Through 2022

The first item on Biden’s agenda is to restart the American economy, which shrank at 3.5% in 2020. It was the largest contraction in the United States since 1946.

We can also expect swing votes to be unpredictable in the Senate. Joe Manchin is a Democrat, but he leans toward the conservative spectrum. Lisa Murkowski is more of a moderate Republican. Both senators are likely to cut deals in some policy areas.

Biden hit the ground running right after his inauguration. The next two years should be quite interesting in American politics.